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Word Choice Consideration

One big difference between level 4 or 5 writers and those of a lower quality level is the ability to correctly use words with respect to both their meaning and spelling. Some of what we'll discuss you may have heard already. Whatever the case, below is what we as editors have noticed in the recent work we reviewed as of late.

We've had quite a few authors write to us over the past few weeks wondering how they snag level 4 articles. One big difference between level 4 or 5 writers and those of a lower quality level is the ability to correctly use words with respect to both their meaning and spelling. Some of what we'll discuss you may have heard already. Whatever the case, below is what we as editors have noticed in the recent work we reviewed as of late. A special note to all of our 2 and 3-star authors: We look forward to seeing these in your next 4-star articles! 

Speaking of a lot, remember it is always two words. We'll usually consider "alot" a typo, and you will likely see this noted in your feedback, along with any other errors we find. Fear not, folks: Some word processing applications such as Microsoft Word will recognize this and correct it for you. GoogleDocs (free!) will also highlight this mistake.

Unfortunately, even Word's fancy grammar and spell checker often will not find fault with "allot" sprinkled in your text instead of the aforementioned a lot. This word, meaning "to assign a share or portion," may also trigger a facepalm from editors when not used correctly. Your best solution and a good guideline to follow in general is to proofread your work before hitting that green "submit text" button.

With no end in sight, it looks like I'm going to spend the next two hours making sure I cite all of my sources in this paper about nuclear test sites, which is actually due in 20 minutes. While these all sound the same when spoken, it's apparent they are used in distinct ways. The most glaring difference is cite is a verb, as people who've had parking tickets or citations can attest to. The other two are nouns; the first is the ability to see, and site is used to describe a place. 

Here’s another set of words that look quite similar, yet they actually convey two different meanings: I like to go to my local fast food joint every day for breakfast, and I wonder if this everyday activity is why my clothes are getting tight on me. The first form is an adverb, modifying and explaining “to go,” and the second form is simply an adjective describing “activity.” 

There you have it, Textbroker authors. Keeping these specific examples and the general concepts we explained in mind when writing will not only impress whoever reads your work but also put you on the road to leveling up at Textbroker. Happy writing!


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